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State preparing in case liquor sales get approved

State preparing in case liquor sales get approved


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) - One of 3 questions voters might see on the November ballot this year could make alcohol sales legal in all 75 Arkansas counties.

Even if voters approve that measure, there will still be lots of work to do at state and local levels to implement the plan.

Arkansas Business Online Editor Lance Turner says officials are already making plans.

Michael Langley, the director of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Division, tells Arkansas Business that he's already been thinking through the possible new law.

If voters do approve the Arkansas Alcoholic Beverage Amendment he's got a plan of action on tap to implement the law, which would go into effect on July 1.

Advocates to educate disabled voters

Advocates to educate disabled voters


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (September 23, 2014) - Disability Rights Center of Arkansas (DRC) and Arkansas State Independent Living Council will host voter education events around central Arkansas on Wednesday and next Tuesday.

Sha Stephens the executive director of the Arkansas State Independent Living Council will be available for interviews on site at the voter registration and education event. These are education events set up to provide people with disabilities with information about voter registration, the right to vote, and the upcoming election.

9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Wednesday, September 24

UCP Adult Habilitation Center-North

401 N. Olive

North Little Rock, AR. 72114

9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Tuesday, September 30

UCP Adult Habilitation Center-South

Advocates to educate disabled voters

Advocates to educate disabled voters


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (September 23, 2014) - Disability Rights Center of Arkansas (DRC) and Arkansas State Independent Living Council will host voter education events around central Arkansas on Wednesday and next Tuesday.

Sha Stephens the executive director of the Arkansas State Independent Living Council will be available for interviews on site at the voter registration and education event. These are education events set up to provide people with disabilities with information about voter registration, the right to vote, and the upcoming election.

9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Wednesday, September 24

UCP Adult Habilitation Center-North

401 N. Olive

North Little Rock, AR. 72114

9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Tuesday, September 30

UCP Adult Habilitation Center-South

Lawsuit filed over Arkansas minimum wage measure

Lawsuit filed over Arkansas minimum wage measure


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - A lawsuit has been filed with the Arkansas Supreme Court aiming to block from the November ballot a proposal to gradually raise the state's minimum wage.

The lawsuit filed Monday asked justices to prevent the state from putting on the ballot the proposed initiated act, which would raise the state's minimum wage from $6.25 an hour to $8.50 an hour by 2017. Election officials earlier this month certified the measure for the ballot.

The lawsuit claims the state used the wrong deadline for accepting petitions for the measure, and also challenges the signatures submitted.

The attorney who filed the challenge did not immediately return a call seeking comment. The chairman of the group backing the wage hike said he was reviewing the lawsuit.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Arkansas Business: Uncertain future for Argenta CDC

Arkansas Business: Uncertain future for Argenta CDC


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) - Argenta Community Development Corp., the nonprofit that help spur redevelopment in downtown North Little Rock, is facing new challenges and an uncertain future.

Among its financial difficulties, a foreclosure lawsuit filed against it after defaulting on a $560,000 loan.

Simmons First National Bank of Pine Bluff filed the foreclosure lawsuit against the CDC last month.

As of now, it looks like Simmons will end up taking over the property at 709 to 715 Main St. in North Little Rock, which the CDC used to secure the loan.

That's because the CDC says it simply doesn't have the money to pay the debt and hasn't been able to find a buyer.

Money has been at the center of the nonprofit's troubles in the last several years. Its previous director, Mary Beth Bowman, resigned in 2013.

Leading black congresswoman visits Little Rock

Leading black congresswoman visits Little Rock


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) – With campaign season in full swing, a prominent African-American Congresswoman stopped in Little Rock on Sunday.

Marcia Fudge of Ohio is the current chair of the Congressional Black Caucus. She addressed voter education and other minority issues at the Union African Methodist Episcopal church on the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Summer, which was the drive to help southern blacks register to vote at the beginning of the civil rights movement.

"It made such a huge difference in this country and because of the violence of the Freedom Summer, it made the president of the United States say 'it's time to pass a civil rights bill,' stated Congresswoman Fudge.

Fudge's visit coincides with controversy over Arkansas' current voter ID law, which is being fought in the state supreme court by groups claiming it could suppress minority votes.


Political ads: Negative vs. positive

Political ads: Negative vs. positive


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) - The competition between political candidates in Arkansas is heating up this year and so are their ad campaigns. With the Senate race in the national spotlight, candidates are pulling out all the stops, and that includes bashing their opponent. But do negative ads really make an impact? And how do they hold up against positive campaigns?

Dr. Greg Schufeldt, a political science professor at UALR, studies the influence of negative ads versus positive ads. He says it's all in the eye of the beholder, or rather, the political party you're affiliated with because everyone sees the facts differently.