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First case of Enterovirus D68 hits Arkansas

First case of Enterovirus D68 hits Arkansas

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) – The Arkansas Department of Health reported its first case of Enterovirus D68 on Monday. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has reported 160 cases in 22 states since mid-August.

"We have a number of suspected cases actually through the northern part of Arkansas and this is the first case that we've gotten the sample results back on that this virus is also in Arkansas, as we suspected," said Dr. Gary Wheeler, Medical Director for Infectious Disease Branch, Arkansas Department of Health.

The virus mimics the common cold with symptoms like sniffling, congestion, and fever. Enterovirus D68 also comes with shortness of breath, fast breathing, and severe coughing.

First case of Enterovirus D68 hits Arkansas

First case of Enterovirus D68 hits Arkansas

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) – The Arkansas Department of Health reported its first case of Enterovirus D68 on Monday. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has reported 160 cases in 22 states since mid-August.

"We have a number of suspected cases actually through the northern part of Arkansas and this is the first case that we've gotten the sample results back on that this virus is also in Arkansas, as we suspected," said Dr. Gary Wheeler, Medical Director for Infectious Disease Branch, Arkansas Department of Health.

The virus mimics the common cold with symptoms like sniffling, congestion, and fever. Enterovirus D68 also comes with shortness of breath, fast breathing, and severe coughing.

Little Rock Family: Medical Monday, Annual scoliosis screenings

Little Rock Family: Medical Monday, Annual scoliosis screenings


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) - Exams are a part of school life for your kids, but there is one that requires no studying but may cause a little anxiety: their annual scoliosis screening.

Parents can help prepare their children for this test and alleviate some of their pre-test stress.

Little Rock Family editor Heather Bennett is here to share some tips on how to get informed and ahead of the curve.

Scoliosis is just a rotational deformity of a child's backbone, when they're bent forward it could look almost like an S or a C. And your pediatrician or your school medical professional can check this out for you.

There are types of scoliosis. There's the idiopathic which has an unknown cause, and then there's congenital which your children would be born with, or a neuromuscular scoliosis which is caused by a medical condition that impacts the nerves or the muscles.

Big Dam Bridge 100 cycling tour to bring 3,000 to central Arkansas

Big Dam Bridge 100 cycling tour to bring 3,000 to central Arkansas

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (September 22, 2014) —Cyclists from across the nation will participate in the Ninth Annual Big Dam Bridge 100 Cycling Tour of Central Arkansas on Saturday, September 27. Crossing the longest bridge built specifically for cyclists, runners and walkers, the event is expected to draw about 3,000 riders of all ages from 30 states and throughout Arkansas.

The event offers rides from 13-100 miles. The 100 mile tour includes Little Rock, North Little Rock, and Pulaski and Perry Counties, with volunteers staffing aid stations throughout the ride. The start line is on La Harpe in Little Rock with riders starting at 7:00 am and 7:30 am. The finish line is on Main Street in North Little Rock.

Grants awarded to 6 UAMS researchers

Grants awarded to 6 UAMS researchers


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Translational Research Institute has announced the award of grants to six UAMS researchers for various projects.

Research institute director Dr. Laura James says each grant is for about $50,000 and are made to studies with the strongest likelihood of developing into larger research programs.

The six researchers awarded the grants are Paul Gottschall; Gur Kaushal; Dr. Dennis Kuo; Lee Ann Macmillan-Crow; Mark Mennemeier; and Steven Post.

The UAMS Translational Research Institute was established with major funding from the National Institutes of Health in 2009.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


Study sheds new light on schizophrenia

Study sheds new light on schizophrenia


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) - Mental health researchers here in Arkansas joining with colleagues around the world in ground-breaking new findings about schizophrenia.

They're spreading the word that the condition commonly thought of as "split personalities" is actually a cluster of 8 genetic disorders.

Doctor Pedro Delgado with UAMS said this latest study is part of a larger trend seen in other medical research.

"Genetic findings are starting to now show that what looks like a single kind of cancer is actually lots of different kinds of cancer that just look similar," said Delgado.

Doctor Delgado says that people with these genetic clusters probably won't escape schizophrenia, but the clusters will give doctors a chance at early intervention, helping them tailor treatment.


More protesting on Tuesday for disabled rights

More protesting on Tuesday for disabled rights


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) - More demonstrations were held on Tuesday after protesters bombarded the Arkansas Health Care Association Headquarters.

On Monday, dozens gathered with a disability rights group refusing to give up the fight for their rights.

The group wants the ability to choose their support instead of being forced into nursing facilities and institutions.

Little Rock police were called to U.S. Representative Mike Ross' office on Tuesday afternoon and have made more arrests for disorderly conduct for people refusing to get out of the street.